• How is the general Pace of Life in East Africa?
    Over time Kenya and Tanzania have developed to become well established tourist destinations. The infrastructure, accommodations, transport and quality of service is of high standards in both countries and is comparable to western standards.

    The pace of life in the Capital cities is as fast as any busy city in the West, however as you travel out towards the countryside and the national parks, the pace of life slows down to allow you to enjoy the beauty of nature. While on safari, allow yourself to slow down and enjoy passing days having sundowners on hilltops and breakfasts by the river beds.

    Uganda & Rwanda;

    Is a relative newcomer to tourism, compared to her neighbors Kenya and Tanzania. The infrastructure, accommodation, transport network and quality and availability of services and facilities are basic by Western standards, but improving. We will do everything in our power to ensure our visitors have the most enjoyable and comfortable trip, however unexpected delays and difficulties may be experienced.  We ask visitors to be patient and enjoy the more relaxed rhythm of life

  • What kind of accommodation do I expect to find in East Africa?

    Uganda & Rwanda;

    The seasoned traveler will find many lodges and camps are not as luxurious as in some African countries, although some properties may exceed expectations. There are accommodations of different standards throughout the country. Electricity and piped/mains water supply may not be available, although clients will always find a hot shower waiting for them after a long day’s trek.  In some remote locations long-drop or compost toilets may be found. Food may be basic, but you are usually assured of fresh produce and a variety of tropical fruits which taste so much better than supermarket imports in the West!The more upmarket lodges and hotels offer excellent facilities on a par with other safari destinations. However, please remember we are a developing economy and expectations should not be unrealistic.

    Kenya & Tanzania;

    In Kenya and Tanzania, luxury is the rule of the day. While you will find modest, comfortable budget accommodations, also expect to find many accommodations that are fit to house a king. Private butlers, star beds under the night sky, chandelier lit bathrooms and world class cuisine are a few of the luxuries that await.  Most accommodations in Kenya and Tanzania have electricity and piped water, you are assured of hot showers and charged electronics.Dining in most Kenya and Tanzania camps and lodges is often an exquisite affair. Food is prepared to world class standards and is always fresh many times from the camps own veggie patches and farms.

  • I understand there are many beggers along the Streets, I would like to give some help, how can I do this?
    We do not recommend clients give money to beggars or street children as this only lends to the culture of begging and dependency. Donations can be made to established international and local charities that work with the homeless, street children or orphans. We can arrange visits to local community projects or institutions on request. If personal donations are preferred, we would suggest exercise books, pens or pencils are useful gifts.

     What’s the general rule of tipping?

    Uganda & Rwanda;

    On average tips are in the region of: 5-10% in restaurants; US$5-10 per day, per client for safari driver/guides and US$5-10 per client, per day for Ranger Guides; US$5 per day for porters on mountaineering/hiking safaris and US$3-5 for Forest Walk guides. Tips are very personal and this is only a guide.  Feel free to ask for advice.

     Kenya & Tanzania;

    Personal gratuities to guides and camp staff are left to the clients’ discretion. Most lodges, camps and hotels have a central tipping box for all staff except the guides who are typically tipped separately. As a general guideline while on safari, for couples, we recommend to tip 10-20 US$ per guest per day for the staff and the same amount for your guide. If you are travelling in a group or as a family, we would recommend 5-15 US$ per guest per day for the staff and the same amount for your guide. During a stay in cities and in a beach hotel, a far more modest tip would be appropriate.

  • Are there any restrictions when taking pictures?
    No photographs of, or near, military buildings or soldiers are allowed. It is only polite to ask people before taking photographs. Film is available in Uganda. Fast film (400-1600 ASA) is recommended for gorilla tracking and forest walking. For digital photography, we recommended you bring extra batteries and a car / solar charger.

    Is there reliable internet/Telephone connection in East Africa?

    International telephone communication is good from most cities but more difficult in some rural areas. East Africa has a good mobile phone network throughout most of the country and local SIM cards can be purchased cheaply. International roaming facilities are available. Internet services are widely available through internet cafes and most major towns will have access, although the quality and speed of the connection varies. All our drivers/guides have cell phones and maintain contact with the Head Office throughout safaris. Airtime can be purchased by clients for use of driver/guide mobile phones if necessary.

  • How are the standards of Roads?

    In Uganda;

    Main roads are generally good and recent road works have much improved the road network in and around Kampala. Secondary roads vary in quality and may be poorly maintained. Be prepared for long and sometimes bumpy car journeys. We call it ‘African Massage’!

    In Kenya;

    Highways and Main roads in Kenya are generally smooth and well connected. The highway network around Nairobi is of world class standard and other main roads around the country are of good quality. A few select areas upcountry may have potholed roads.

    In Tanzania;

    Most main roads in Tanzania are also of good quality and the drives to various parks are often smooth. A select few roads are potholed but for the most part the road network is very comfortable.

    In Rwanda;

    The road network in Rwanda received a recent upheaval and most roads are paved and in good condition. During the rainy season many side roads are passable only with four-wheel drive vehicles.

  • Please advice me on any security measures I can take during my safari?
    Occasional security issues may arise as in any country.  Binti Safaris, maintains up-to-date information on all parts of the country and will advise clients accordingly at the time of booking if any risks appear to be present. Basic precautions should be taken, as in all countries, and common sense should be used.  It is not advised to display expensive jewelry, leave bags unattended or money lying around.  Most hotels and lodges have safe deposit boxes available. We recommend that you leave original travel documents and passports with us in our safe (if you wish) and travel with photocopies. East African residents should ensure they always have with them their proof of residency.
  • Am really interested in tracking Gorillas but I understand there are many rules and regulation, please shed some light for me?
    This is a strenuous activity and one should be physically fit to enjoy this safari.  Professional guides will accompany groups but no porters are available to carry personal belongings. Minimum age is fifteen years.  Anyone with signs of communicable disease will not be allowed to trek.

    While possession of a gorilla permit is a guarantee of trekking, it cannot be a guarantee of sighting. However the chance of sighting is high – 95% or more. Maximum time allowed with the gorillas is one hour at a minimum distance of 7 meters.

    No flash photography is allowed and fast film is therefore recommended (minimum 400-1600 ASA). Personal DVD recorders are allowed. Bring film and batteries from Kampala. Special arrangements need to be made for professional film makers and filming permits are required for commercial photography and filming.

    For Gorilla Tracking, we strongly recommend a breathable and lightweight rain jacket or poncho, a warm jacket or fleece for overcast days and evening, long-sleeved shirt and trousers, sturdy waterproof walking boots (seasoned or well worn footwear), leather gardening type gloves, sunscreen, cap or sun hat, sunglasses, insect repellent, comfortable day pack for carrying water and minimum amount of personal items.

    Please note that Gorilla tracking is date specific, so you will need to advise exact dates of travel for us to go ahead and advise availability.  A maximum of only 24 permits per day are available for advance booking, so confirmation 4-12 months in advance is required to avoid disappointment. Occasionally, permits are available to us at short notice.

    Permits are only purchased upon receipt of your deposit, after confirmation from you.  Gorilla permits are booked on a “first come first served” CASH basis and therefore can be purchased by others on your behalf.  Please do make a decision as soon as you can in order to avoid disappointment.

  • Is it a guarantee that I will get to see the Gorillas?
    When it comes to game viewing, please be advised there are no guarantees.  It is a privilege to see animals in their natural habitat.  Take only a photograph; leave only a footprint.  A gorilla permit guarantees you will trek gorillas to their location but does not guarantee that the gorillas be in plain sight. However the chance of sighting is high – 95% or more.
  • When is the Best time to travel to

    Kenya;

    There is no best time to go on safari. Something unusual is happening in the wildlife world every day of the year. With this in mind, we plan an itinerary to suit you and your schedule. The climate is surprisingly mild and temperate. Days tend to be warm with low humidity, but the evenings can be chilly so make sure you bring a sweater. December through to March is dry heat and the coolest months are July and August, when there can be some cloud cover.

    The busiest tourist seasons are December through January, with Christmas and New Year being extremely busy, and the annual wildebeest migration into the Masai Mara which occurs between late July and October. You are recommended to book well in advance for these times of year. Rainfall in East Africa can vary. However, most rain falls during the ‘long rains’ in April and May. Even those months can be fine safari times as the dust has been laid. This is when the country is at the most beautiful with green grass, newborn animals and an abundance of wild flowers.

    The best time for hiking and climbing is late June to October and late December to February. The best time for sailing and scuba diving is from late September to early April as the strong South East Monsoon results in quite rough seas between June and mid September.. Deep sea fishing is possible all year but the seas can be rough during May, June and November, it is best between December and March.

    Tanzania;

    The weather is coolest and driest from late June to September, although in July and August, hotels and park lodges, especially in the north, are at their fullest. You are recommended to book well in advance for these times of year. October and November are very pleasant, with fewer crowds and a slowly greening-up landscape as the short rains begin in many areas. From late December until February, temperatures are high, but not oppressive. Accommodation prices during Christmas and new Years are also very high.

    The best months to climb Kilimanjaro are January, February and September when it is warm and dry.

    The best time for sailing and scuba diving is from late September to early April as the strong South East Monsoon results in quite rough seas between June and mid September. Deep sea fishing is possible all year but the seas can be rough during May, June and November, it is best between December and March.

    Uganda;

    Uganda has the gift of Holiday weather year around.  There are two reasons, one is its location on the equator and the other one its elevation. Temperatures range between 23-29 degrees Celsius. There are two rainy seasons in the year; short rains are from April to May and are accompanied by fantastic thunderstorms. The long rains are in September to November. Even during the two rainy seasons, do not let the words fool you, the sun is out most of the time and rain often occurs at night and during the early morning hours along with a most delightful thunderstorm and when it rains, it pours but soon the sun’s rays have dried up the earth once again

    The busiest tourist seasons are December through to February, and June to September. You are recommended to book well in advance for these times of year. The best time for hiking and gorilla tracking is in December to Late February and June to September, as the earth if dry. Climbing the Ruwenzori mountains in best during the dry season as weather and obscure the mountain peaks.

    Rwanda;

    The best time to visit Rwanda is from June till the beginning of September as this is the driest time of the year. However, during this time the endless hills are barren, a contrast to the verdant greens of the wet season. Short rains are from January to April and the long rains are in October to December. In the rainy season between December, March and April, travelling to the rainforest to see the animals becomes hazardous as many of the routes become impassable. Peak season for gorilla tracking is July and August; however travelling outside this time means it is easier to arrange a permit.

  • What is the weather in East Africa like?

    Kenya;

    Kenya is divided by the Equator and enjoys a tropical climate. The hottest period is in February and March and the coldest in July and August when temperatures in Nairobi are often in the 15ºC and down to the low 10ºC in the Aberdare region. The long rains occur from April to June and short rains from October to December. It seldom rains all day and short, heavy rain showers are usually followed by sunny periods making this a very pleasant time to visit Kenya.

    The coast can be humid and there are hot, desert conditions around Lake Magadi and in the North around Lake Turkana. But most destinations in Kenya boast temperatures between 21ºC-32ºC by day, and rarely below 13ºC at night. Even during the short rains, the humidity is low for much of the day, and the skies clear enough to reveal the Milky Way.

    Uganda;

    Uganda is on the Equator which gives it an ideal climate with little variation. Mean temperatures are between 21°C and 31°C  all the year round. There are two rainy seasons from March to April and October to November. Travel is often slower in the rainy season and trekking more difficult. Mountainous areas tend to be much colder than the plains and receive more rain. Temperatures in mountainous areas can go down to 10°c in certain months.

    Tanzania;

    Tanzania has a generally comfortable, tropical climate year-round, although there are significant regional variations. Along the warmer and humid coast, the climate is determined in large part by the monsoon winds, which bring rains in two major periods.

    The coolest months countrywide are from June to October and the warmest from December to March. During the masika (long rains), from mid-March to May, it rains heavily almost every day, although seldom for the whole day, and the air can get unpleasantly sticky. The lighter mvuli (short rains), fall in November, December and sometimes into January. The central plateau is somewhat cooler and arid, while in the mountainous areas of the northeast and southwest, temperatures occasionally drop below 15°C at night during June and July, and it can rain at any time of year.

    Rwanda;

    Rwanda is warm for the most part and cooler in the higher altitudes – the mountains. The average daytime temperature is around 24°C, except in the higher mountains, which take up a lot of the country, where the range is 10°C to 15°C. The country has 2 main wet seasons; the first rainy season running from January to April and the second running from October to December. Gorilla trekking is often hazardous in the wet season and it is advised to do it in the drier seasons.

  • What is the currency in East Africa and should I convert my foreign currency to the local one while travelling?

    Kenya;

    The currency in Kenya is the Kenyan Shilling and there is no restriction on the amount of foreign currency that can be imported. The notes are available in denominations of 1,000, 500, 200, 100 and 50. Coins are available in denominations of 20, 10, 5, 2 and 1.

    Money can be exchanged at international airports and authorised dealers and banks. However, in smaller towns, it may be difficult to change money. Hotels will also be able to change your money, but at a substantial fee.

    International credit cards are only accepted by upmarket lodges, major hotels and some larger retailers in Kenya. 24 hour access to your account can be facilitated by a network of ATMs countrywide.

    Travellers’ cheques are typically accepted in large towns only. We therefore recommend that you bring most of your cash requirements during your trip (mainly for visa, gratuities and local purchase) in US$ in cash. 100 US$ bank notes achieve better exchange rates than smaller denominations. Bank notes printed before 2003 are carrying a higher risk of counterfeit and are therefore often not accepted. It is highly recommended to carry plenty of small change with you during your Africa trip, for small payments, tips, alms etc. It is also advisable for visitors to use up or convert back any local currency before leaving, as it will be difficult to change once overseas.

    Uganda;

    The currency in Uganda is the Uganda Shilling. It is issued in denominations of 1,000 / 5,000 / 10,000 / 20,000 / 50,000 Uganda Shillings notes.  Coins are available for smaller denominations of 100, 200 and 500 Shillings.

    US dollar, GB Pounds and EUROs are readily exchangeable. Large US dollar bills attract the best exchange rates. Currency exchange rates vary and are posted at all banks and forex bureaus around Kampala and in the local newspapers.  ATM machines are available in Kampala and most offer access to international banks. We recommend visitors change money in Kampala prior to safari to get more favorable rates.

    Travellers’ cheques are typically accepted in large towns only. We therefore recommend that you bring most of your cash requirements during your trip (mainly for visa, gratuities and local purchase) in US$ in cash. 100 US$ bank notes achieve better exchange rates than smaller denominations. Please, make sure that none of the bank notes you bring to Africa have been printed before 2003.Bank notes printed before 2003 are carrying a higher risk of counterfeit and are therefore often not accepted.

    It is highly recommended to carry plenty of small change with you during your Africa trip, for small payments, tips, alms etc. It is also advisable for visitors to use up or convert back any local currency before leaving, as it will be difficult to change once overseas.

    Tanzania;

    The currency in Tanzania is the Tanzanian Shilling and there is no restriction on the amount of foreign currency that can be imported. The notes are available in denominations Tsh10, 000, 5000, 1000 and 500. Coins are available in denominations of Tsh200, 100, 50, 20, 10, five and one shilling(s).

    Money can be exchanged at international airports and authorized dealers and banks. However, in smaller towns, it may be difficult to change money. Hotels will also be able to change your money, but at a substantial fee.  International credit cards are only accepted by some upmarket lodges, major hotels and some larger retailers in Tanzania although not always. 24 hour access to your account can be facilitated by a network of ATMs countrywide.

    Travellers’ cheques are typically accepted in large towns only. We therefore recommend that you bring most of your cash requirements during your trip (mainly for visa, gratuities and local purchase) in US$ in cash. 100 US$ bank notes achieve better exchange rates than smaller denominations. Bank notes printed before 2003 are carrying a higher risk of counterfeit and are therefore often not accepted. It is highly recommended to carry plenty of small change with you during your Africa trip, for small payments, tips, alms etc. It is also advisable for visitors to use up or convert back any local currency before leaving, as it will be difficult to change once overseas.

    Rwanda;

    The currency in Rwanda is the Rwandan franc and there is no restriction on the amount of foreign currency that can be imported. The notes are available in denominations 20, 50, 100, 500, 1000, 2000 and 5000. Coins are available in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100.

     Money can be exchanged at international airports and authorized dealers and banks. However, in smaller towns, it may be difficult to change money. A few hotels will also be able to change your money, but at a substantial fee.  International credit cards are accepted in only a few upmarket lodges and major hotels. 24 hour access to your account can be facilitated by a network of ATMs countrywide. Visa cards are generally easier to use than Mastercards in many ATMs in the country and not all ATMS can do international withdrawals.

    Travellers’ cheques are accepted mainly in Kigali. We therefore recommend that you bring most of your cash requirements during your trip (mainly for visa, gratuities and local purchase) in US$ in cash. 100 US$ bank notes achieve better exchange rates than smaller denomination. Bank notes printed before 2003 are carrying a higher risk of counterfeit and are therefore often not accepted. It is highly recommended to carry plenty of small change with you during your Africa trip, for small payments, tips, alms etc. It is also advisable for visitors to use up or convert back any local currency before leaving, as it will be difficult to change once overseas.

  • What are the Health requirements for a travel to East Africa if any?

    Kenya;

    Proof of vaccination against Yellow Fever is not required any more for visitors to Kenya from the USA and Europe unless they arrive from most African countries other than Tanzania and Uganda. In this case and for citizens of other countries, the Yellow Fever vaccination must have been administered at least 10 days before entering Kenya. Anti-malarial prophylactics are strongly recommended, although malaria dos not exist in all areas. Obviously, the best preventive is not to get bitten. Bring a good insect repellent and wear long-sleeved shirts, trousers and socks in the evening.

    It is advisable to visit your local personal physician at least a month before travelling in order to update any vaccinations, obtain anti-malarial treatment and any long term medication that you may require.

    Dehydration is a common problem, and we like to advise clients to drink as much water as possible to prevent this probability. Please bring a sunscreen of at least factor 15-30 to prevent sunburn and sunstroke. Dark glasses and a good hat or cap that shades the face are also essential.

    There are several excellent private hospitals in Kenya.  Clients are fully responsible for securing adequate medical insurance which should include evacuation cover. However, Binti Safaris can organize Emergency Air Evacuation with the Flying Doctors of Africa at a cost of USD 15 per person for up to 14 days for travels in East Africa.

    Uganda;

    More adventurous activities such as mountaineering and hiking, gorilla and chimp tracking, white-water rafting, canoeing and kayaking may pose additional risks and should be undertaken with care and caution.  Clients must be fit and healthy. Gorilla and Chimp trekking is not permitted to those individuals who have signs of a communicable disease such as colds, flu and other airborne diseases.  Chimps and gorillas are highly susceptible to human diseases and it is therefore essential that clients declare all illnesses. Please seek our advice if you are unsure. National Park Authorities reserve the right to deny access to individuals.

    Anti-malaria tablets and mosquito repellent are essential. Seek advice from your home country on vaccination and inoculation requirements. Uganda is part of the Yellow Fever belt and although not always checked by Ugandan Immigration on arrival, a Yellow Fever card is required by law.

    Please bring all your personal medications with you. Medical services and facilities in Uganda are basic. Clients are fully responsible for securing adequate medical insurance which should include evacuation cover. However, Binti Safaris can organize Emergency Air Evacuation with the Flying Doctors of Africa at a cost of USD 15 per person for up to 14 days for travels in East Africa.

    Tanzania;

    No immunizations are required by law to enter Tanzania if you are travelling directly from Europe or the US. If you are travelling from a country where Yellow Fever is present you will need to prove you have had the inoculation. The Yellow Fever vaccination must have been administered at least 10 days before entering Tanzania. Anti-malarial prophylactics are strongly recommended, although malaria does not exist in all areas. Obviously, the best preventive is not to get bitten. Bring a good insect repellent and wear long-sleeved shirts, trousers and socks in the evening.

    Dehydration is a common problem, and we like to advise clients to drink as much water as possible to prevent this probability. Please bring a sunscreen of at least factor 15-30 to prevent sunburn and sunstroke. Dark glasses and a good hat or cap that shades the face are also essential.

    It is advisable to visit your local personal physician at least a month before travelling in order to update any vaccinations, obtain anti-malarial treatment and any long term medication that you may require. There are several good private hospitals in Tanzania. Binti Safaris can organize Emergency Air Evacuation with the Flying Doctors of Africa at a cost of USD 15 per person for up to 14 days for travels in East Africa.

    Rwanda;

    Gorilla and Chimp trekking is not permitted to those individuals who have signs of a communicable disease such as colds, flu and other airborne diseases.  Chimps and gorillas are highly susceptible to human diseases and it is therefore essential that clients declare all illnesses. Please seek our advice if you are unsure. National Park Authorities reserve the right to deny access to individuals.

    A yellow fever immunization certificate is required for entry into Rwanda. The Yellow Fever vaccination must have been administered at least 10 days before entering Rwanda. Anti-malarial prophylactics are also strongly recommended, although malaria does not exist in all areas. Obviously, the best preventive is not to get bitten. Bring a good insect repellent and wear long-sleeved shirts, trousers and socks in the evening. It is advisable to visit your local personal physician at least a month before travelling in order to update any vaccinations, obtain anti-malarial treatment and any long term medication that you may require.

    Dehydration is a common problem, and we like to advise clients to drink as much water as possible to prevent this probability. Please bring a sunscreen of at least factor 15-30 to prevent sunburn and sunstroke. Dark glasses and a good hat or cap that shades the face are also essential.

    There are several good private hospitals in Kigali. Binti Safaris can organize Emergency Air Evacuation with the Flying Doctors of Africa at a cost of USD 15 per person for up to 14 days for travels in East Africa.

  • What are the visa requirements for a travel to East Africa?

    Kenya;

    All visitors to Kenya except East African Citizens require a visa, irrespective of nationality.

    Residents of the EU, US, Switzerland, Australia, India and several other countries can obtain a three months visitor visa upon arrival. The cost of a tourist visa is currently USD50 per person. Multiple entry visas are however not available at point of entry and must be obtained in advance at Kenya’s embassies.

    Uganda;

    Single entry tourist visas are available on arrival at Entebbe airport priced at US$50 and at the land borders. We recommend clients obtain them on arrival. Uganda follows a policy of reciprocity (if your Country requires a Visa for Ugandans to enter, Uganda will impose the same). Irish Nationals do not require visas. Visas are valid for 3 months.

    Tanzania;

    All visitors to Tanzania except East African Citizens require a visa, irrespective of nationality.

    Tanzanian visas are available at all major land borders and international airports.Tanzanian embassies issue single ($50) and double ($100) entry visas. Tanzanian tourist visas are valid for 6 months from the date of issue.

    Rwanda;

    Visa is NOT required for nationals of Burundi, Canada, Germany, Hong Kong, Kenya, DR of Congo, Mauritius, South Africa, Sweden, Tanzania, Uganda, UK, and USA. Citizens of these countries can remain in Rwanda for 90 days.

    Nationals from other countries require a visa. It costs USD.60 and is valid for 3 months.

  • Do you provide travel Insurance?
    Binti Safaris does not provide any travel insurance. We suggest that you make arrangements so that you and your property are fully insured for the duration of you stay, as well as for travel in light aircraft if applicable. Similarly, we recommend arranging for adequate insurance in the unforeseen event of the cancellation of your safari.
  • What kind of clothing should I carry for my African safari?

    Kenya & Tanzania;

    Safari wear should be comfortable and casual. Evenings and early mornings can be chilly so warm sweaters are recommended. Low heeled comfortable shoes are best, and suitable walking shoes should you intend joining any walking safaris. A hat, sunglasses, flashlight and binoculars are useful accessories. Many hotels, lodges and camps have swimming pools so you are advised to bring swimsuits. The coastal regions of Kenya and Tanzania have significant Muslim majorities and some sensitivity to cultural dress codes is important. Some specialist safaris, i.e. mountain climbing, require extra items of clothing and footwear – details would be provided on booking. Sunscreen and insect repellent are recommended. Furthermore, almost all safari lodges and camps provide same day laundry service.

    Uganda & Rwanda;

    Light summer cotton clothing supplemented by a sweater or jacket should be sufficient all year round for most of Uganda and Rwanda. In the hilly and mountainous areas, waterproof jackets or ponchos, strong waterproof walking boots and warmer fleece or heavy sweaters will be required in the evening. Informal dress is usual, although Ugandan’s appreciate modest dressing. Cotton slacks and flat comfortable walking shoes are recommended on safari.  Don’t forget to bring a hat and sun protection, along with your swimsuit.    Request additional details at the time of booking for specific requirements tied to adventure or activities.

    Due to lack of space in the vehicle and light aircraft, we advise you to keep your luggage to the minimum. We suggest you pack your bush kit into a duffel bag of no more than 15 kgs. Security in the luggage rooms of our recommended city hotels is excellent so you can leave suitcases behind with a peaceful mind. Furthermore, almost all safari lodges and camps provide same day laundry service.

  • Am really confused about the viewing of the wildebeest migration, please shed some light on this world spectacle?

    Kenya & Tanzania;

    East Africa’s most spectacular annual event is organized by an unlikely group – wildebeests.Literally millions of these ungainly antelopes move en masse between May and September from the Serengeti in Tanzania to the Maasai Mara in Kenya. They head south again from the Masai Mara to the Serengeti around October. Wildebeest follow the rains in order to benefit from the superior nutrition that shorter, newer grass has to offer. Their acute sense of smell helps them track and follow the phosphorus in the grass, causing the main migration to move in a yearly clockwise circle through the Mara and Serengeti regions of Kenya and Tanzania. Over 1.9 million animals are estimated to take part in the migration, including 1.3 million wildebeest, 400,000 gazelles, 200,000 zebras and 18,000 elands. Predators like lions, hyenas, leopards and cheetahs must follow the wildebeest migration or lose their food sources. The best place to see this phenomenon is at the Masai Mara National Reserve or the Serengeti game reserve. However Game Viewing in Kenya and Tanzania is good all year round.

    What is the Time Difference

    Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania are 3 hours ahead of Greenwich Mean Time (London)

    Rwanda is 2 hours ahead of Greenwich Mean Time (London)

  • What kind of pin do you use for the electric sockets and should I carry my own adaptors?

    Kenya & Uganda;

    Uses 240V and 50Hz. The plug in use throughout Kenya is of the three square pin, 13amp type. Adaptors are readily available at electronic stores in case you don’t bring one with you. It is recommended that you bring your own adaptor. Most hotels, lodges or camps can make arrangements for recharging batteries. Power cuts are not uncommon, many rural areas have little or no power and few streets have street lights.

    Tanzania;

    Uses 230V and 50HZ. The plug in use throughout Tanzania is of the three square pin, 13amp type. Adaptors are readily available at electronic stores in case you don’t bring one with you. It is recommended that you bring your own adaptor. Most hotels, lodges or camps can make arrangements for recharging batteries.

    Rwanda;

    Uses 220 V and 50 HZ. The plugs in use are the two round pin type or the three round pin type. Adaptors are available in stores in Kigali; however it is advisable to bring your own.